Social Costs and the need to re-think First Principles

As Canadian economic and business analysts pore over the latest round of dismal to mediocre economic data, seeking to parse any nuggets of market pleasing information that can be used to shore up their confirmatory biases, the world of ordinary citizens and average households feels an increasing sense of despair. The problem is that the … Continue reading Social Costs and the need to re-think First Principles

Part 2: Reclaiming the Public Interest in Canada

The outline of both a sustainable ecological future and a more equitable political economy will only emerge when new collaborative approaches and public-spirited incentive systems replace the perverse, winner-take-all logic favored by those interests committed to business-as-usual policies.  In this regard, three policy and institutional changes are required if we are to dislodge the baleful … Continue reading Part 2: Reclaiming the Public Interest in Canada

Neoliberalism, Pipelines and Canadian Political Economy

https://www.counterpunch.org/2018/06/22/neoliberalism-pipelines-and-canadian-political-economy/ The national debate about how to get diluted bitumen to trans-oceanic markets by means of a twinning of the existing Kinder Morgan pipeline route between Alberta and British Columbia – known as the Trans Mountain Pipeline Expansion Project – illustrates the sad state of economic planning, diversification and vision in Canada. The current policy … Continue reading Neoliberalism, Pipelines and Canadian Political Economy

Part 1: Canada and the Erosion of the Public Interest

“My main point…has been that market systems imprison policy.  Those of us who live in those market oriented systems that are called liberal democratic exercise significantly less control over policy than we have thought…That our thinking is itself imprisoned is a separate phenomenon of importance.” The Market as Prison, Charles E. Lindblom, The Journal of … Continue reading Part 1: Canada and the Erosion of the Public Interest